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Seas to Rise About a Meter Even if Climate Goals Are Met - Study

           

FILE PHOTO: Uninhabitable apartments, in danger of collapsing into the Pacific Ocean, line Esplanade Ave. in Pacifica, California January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Noah Berger/File Photo

CLICK HERE - STUDY - Committed sea-level rise under the Paris Agreement and the legacy of delayed mitigation action

reuters.com - Alister Doyle - February 20, 2018

Sea levels will rise between 0.7 and 1.2 meters (27-47 inches) in the next two centuries even if governments end the fossil fuel era as promised under the Paris climate agreement, scientists said on Tuesday.

Early action to cut greenhouse gas emissions would limit the long-term rise, driven by a thaw of ice from Greenland to Antarctica that will re-draw global coastlines, a German-led team wrote in the journal Nature Communications . . .

 . . . By 2300, the report projected that sea levels would gain by 0.7-1.2 meters, even if almost 200 nations fully meet goals under the 2015 Paris Agreement, which include cutting greenhouse gas emissions to net zero in the second half of this century . . . 

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Risk of Extreme Weather Events Higher if Paris Agreement Goals Aren't Met

                                                

CLICK HERE - RESEARCH - STUDY - Unprecedented climate events: Historical changes, aspirational targets, and national commitments

sciencedaily.com - by Stanford University - Taylor Kubota - February 14, 2018

The individual commitments made by parties of the United Nations Paris Agreement are not enough to fulfill the agreement's overall goal of limiting global temperature rise to less than 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. The difference between the U.N. goal and the actual country commitments is a mere 1 C, which may seem negligible. But a study from Stanford University, published Feb. 14 in Science Advances, finds that even that 1-degree difference could increase the likelihood of extreme weather.

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ALSO SEE RELATED ARTICLE HERE - Scientists Just Issued a Grim New Warning on Climate Change: 'We Are Not Prepared'

 

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Satellite Observations Show Sea Levels Rising, and Climate Change Is Accelerating It

           

Changes in sea level observed between 1992 and 2014. Orange/red colors represent higher sea levels, while blue colors show where sea levels are lower.

CLICK HERE - STUDY - PNAS - Climate-change–driven accelerated sea-level rise detected in the altimeter era

cnn.com - by Brandon Miller - February 13, 2018

Sea level rise is happening now, and the rate at which it is rising is increasing every year, according to a study released Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Researchers, led by University of Colorado-Boulder professor of aerospace engineering sciences Steve Nerem, used satellite data dating to 1993 to observe the levels of the world's oceans.

Using satellite data rather than tide-gauge data that is normally used to measure sea levels allows for more precise estimates of global sea level, since it provides measurements of the open ocean.

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Drought Returns to Texas Just Months After Hurricane Harvey Floods State

           

Note: Maps depict drought conditions during the final week of every month. January's map is current as of Jan. 16. - Source: United States Drought Monitor - Credit: Annie Daniel

Just five months after the monster storm gave Texas its wettest month in history, much of the state is now in a drought — including areas that saw historic flooding.

texastribune.org - by Paul Cobler - January 24, 2018

 . . . More than 40 percent of Texas is now in a moderate to severe drought, according to the latest data from the U.S. Drought Monitor. That's compared to 4 percent on Aug. 29, a few days after Harvey slammed into the South Texas coast.

And dry conditions are expected to worsen over the coming months.

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CLICK HERE - United States Drought Monitor

 

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Hurricane Center: Harvey’s ‘Overwhelming’ Rains Were Likely Nation’s Most Extreme ‘Ever’

CLICK HERE - NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER - TROPICAL CYCLONE REPORT - HURRICANE HARVEY - 17 AUGUST - 1 SEPTEMBER 2017 (76 page .PDF report)

washingtonpost.com - by Jason Samenow - January 25, 2017

Hurricane Harvey unleashed a tropical deluge probably unsurpassed in U.S. history. The National Hurricane Center released its in-depth meteorological review of the storm Thursday and said it was unable to identify any past storm that unloaded so much rain over such a large area.

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ALSO SEE RELATED ARTICLE HERE - NHC: Harvey caused $125 billion in damage; 68 deaths in Texas

ALSO SEE: NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE - Major Hurricane Harvey - August 25-29, 2017

 

 

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Well, At Least One Catastrophic Climate Scenario Is Looking Less Likely

           

An aggregation of methane ice worms seen on a methane hydrate in the Gulf of Mexico. Image: NOAA

CLICK HERE - STUDY - Limited contribution of ancient methane to surface waters of the U.S. Beaufort Sea shelf

earther.com - by Maddie Stone - January 18, 2018

There’s been loads of media hype regarding the Arctic “methane bomb,” an idea that rising temperatures could cause a pulse of ancient methane, locked in permafrost and frozen hydrates on the ocean floor, to escape to the atmosphere, triggering catastrophic global warming. Well, we have some positive news for you: a new study finds little evidence to support this scenario playing out in at least one fast-warming part of the world . . .

 . . . “Our data suggest that even if increasing amounts of methane are released from degrading hydrates as climate change proceeds, catastrophic emission to the atmosphere is not an inherent outcome,” lead study author Katy Sparrow of the University of Rochester said in a statement.

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Climate Change 'Will Create World's Biggest Refugee Crisis'

CLICK HERE - Beyond Borders: Our changing climate – its role in conflict and displacement

Experts warn refugees could number tens of millions in the next decade, and call for a new legal framework to protect the most vulnerable

theguardian.com - by Matthew Taylor - November 2, 2017

Tens of millions of people will be forced from their homes by climate change in the next decade, creating the biggest refugee crisis the world has ever seen, according to a new report.

Senior US military and security experts have told the Environmental Justice Foundation (EJF) study that the number of climate refugees will dwarf those that have fled the Syrian conflict, bringing huge challenges to Europe.

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2017 U.S. billion-dollar weather and climate disasters: a historic year in context

           

This map depicts the general location of the sixteen weather and climate disasters assessed to cause at least one billion dollars in direct damages during 2017.

climate.gov - by Adam B. Smith - January 8, 2018

NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) tracks U.S. weather and climate events that have great economic and societal impacts (www.ncdc.noaa.gov/billions). Since 1980, the U.S. has sustained 219 weather and climate disasters where the overall damage costs reached or exceeded $1 billion (including adjustments based on the Consumer Price Index, as of December 2017). The cumulative costs for these 219 events exceed $1.5 trillion.

During 2017, the U.S. experienced a historic year of weather and climate disasters.  In total, the U.S. was impacted by 16 separate billion-dollar disaster events including: three tropical cyclones, eight severe storms, two inland floods, a crop freeze, drought and wildfire.

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Hurricanes blew away Puerto Rico's power grid. Now solar power is rising to fill the void.

submitted by Bill Sullivan

           

usatoday.com - by Daniella Cheslow - January 5, 2018

More than three months after Hurricanes Maria and Irma slammed their island, over a million Puerto Ricans are still without reliable power. But one recent day, Rosa López and José Quiñones finally left those ranks.

It happened when four technicians installed a Tesla Powerwall solar battery pack onto a wall in their suburban San Juan home — a 275-pound white metal beast that can store enough electricity to keep a house running from sunset to sunrise.

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Why the Bomb Cyclone Hitting the East Coast is So Unusual

           

Alora Freeman, 8, watches as ice builds along a downtown water fountain in Atlanta, Jan. 3, 2018.  David Goldman / AP

wired.com - by Megan Molteni - January 3, 2018

NOW, THE FIRST thing you should know about a bomb cyclone is it’s just a name—and unlike a sharknado, it’s not a literal one. The very real scientific term describes a storm that suddenly intensifies following a rapid drop in atmospheric pressure. Bombing out, or “bombogenesis,” is when a cyclone’s central pressure drops 24 millibars or more in 24 hours, bringing furious winds that can quickly create blizzard conditions and coastal flooding.

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ALSO SEE RELATED ARTICLES WITHIN THE LINKS BELOW . . .

CLICK HERE - ‘Bomb Cyclone’: Rare Snow in South as North Braces for Bitter Cold

CLICK HERE - Winter storm slams Southeast, forecast to explode as 'bomb cyclone' in Northeast

 

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